Japanese I-10

Kanjis: 1st grade + JLPT N5; Additional kanjis for lessons 9-16:

はん – meal ひる – noon 明日 あした – tomorrow
ばん – evening つぎ – next

Conversation transcript

This is not a transcript of the dialog in the recording.


Instructions
Listen to the following conversation
tsugi no kai-wa wo ki-ite kudasai
つぎの かいわを きいて ください。
次の会話を聞いて下さい。


Listen again
mou ichido ki-ite kudasai
もう いちど きいて ください。
もういちど聞いて下さい。



English
1: Mr. Ueda; 2: Ms. Mori

1: Ms. Mori,
    do you have a moment?
2: Wait a moment, please.
    Yes, what is it?
1: Have you had lunch already?
2: Not yet.
    Let’s eat together.
1: Yes, thank you. Is 1:00 alright?
2: 1:00 o’clock doesn’t work…
    How about 2:00?
1: Yes, that works. Well, see you at 2:00.


romaji
1: ueda shi; 2: mori fujin

1: mori san,
    chotto jikan ga arimasu ka?
2: chotto matte, kudasai.
    Hai, nan desu ka?
1: mou hiru-gohan wo tabe-mashita ka?
2: iie, mada desu.
    issho ni tabe-mashou.
1: ee, ii desu ne. ichi-ji ni?
2: ichi-ji wa chotto…
    ni-ji wa?
1: ee, kekkou desu. Jaa, ni-ji ni.



kana
1: うえだ し; 2: もり ふじん

1: もりさん、
    ちょっと じかんが ありますか。
2: ちょっと まって、ください。
    はい、なん ですか。
1: もう ひるごはんを たべましたか。
2: いいえ、まだ です。
    いっしょに たべましょう。
1: ええ、いい ですね。いちじに?
2: いちじは ちょっと… 
    にじは?
1: ええ、けっこう です。じゃあ、にじに。


kanji (show me)
1: 上田氏; 2: 森夫人

1: 森さん、
    ちょっと時間がありますか。
2: ちょっとまって、ください。
    はい、何ですか?
1: もう昼ごはんを食べましたか。
2: いいえ、まだです。
    いっしょに食べましょう。
1: ええ、いいですね。1時に?
2: 1時はちょっと…
    2時は?
1: ええ、けっこうです。じゃあ、2時に。


Vocabulary


English
next, following

meeting, assembly
talk; speech
conversation

again, another
once, one time
once more, again

three
four
five

a little bit

to listen
masu (formal)
dict (casual)
-te (imperative)

to kindly do
masu (formal)
dict (casual)
-te (imperative)


romaji
tsugi

kai
wa
kai-wa

mou
ichido
mou ichido

san
yon
go

chotto

 
kiki-masu
kiku
kiite

 
kudasai-masu
kudasaru
kudasatte


kana
つぎ

かい

かいわ

もう
いちど
もういちど

さん
よん

ちょっと

 
ききます
きく
きいて

 
くださいます
くださる
くださって


kanji
 



会話

 
 
 



一寸

 
聞きます
聞く
聞いて

 
下さいます
下さる
下さって


  • The name of 4 is ‘yon’ (よん) but, to facilitate the pronunciation when combined with certain sounds, it’s sometimes shortened to ‘yo’ (よ). Thus, 4:00 is ‘yo-ji’ (よじ), not ‘yon-ji’.
  • Kanjis in red are correct but usually the word is written in kana.

Sample sentences

Eng: But, won’t you join me later for lunch?

lit: But, later with me won’t you eat lunch?


formal
demo, ato de watashi to hiru-gohan wo tabe-masen ka?

でも、あとで わたしと ひるごはんを たべませんか。

でも、後で私と昼ご飯を食べませんか。

casual
demo, ato de boku to hiru-gohan wo tabe-nai?

でも、あとで ぼくと ひるごはんを たべない?

でも、後で僕と昼ご飯を食べない?



Comments

The following comments explain some of the grammar in more detail.

Expressions

kudasai/kure – ください・くれ

kudasai can be written in kanji as 下さい, but it is usually written in hiragana: ください. ‘kudasai’ is a polite request that means ‘Please, give me …’:


English
Please, give me money
Please, give me 10 dollars


romaji
o-kane wo kudasai
juu doru kudasai


kana
おかねをください
じゅうドルください


The casual form of ‘kudasai’ is ‘kure’, which means ‘give me … ‘, without any politeness, i.e., it’s less of a request and more of an order:


English
give me money!
give me 10 dollars!


romaji
o-kane wo kure
juu doru kure


kana
おかねをくれ
じゅうドルくれ


kanji
お金をくれ
十ドルくれ


Verbs

-te kudasai/kure

In Lesson 10, the narrator uses the ‘-te kudasai’ form to introduce the dialog:


listen to the following conversation, please.


tsugi no kai-wa wo ki-ite, kudasai.


The ‘-te kudasai’ is a polite request. ‘kudasai” comes from the verb ‘kudasaru’; when we precede it with verb form in ‘-te’ form, ‘-te kudasai’ means “to, please, for me, do”. We can replace the formal ‘kudasai’ for the casual ‘kure’ to remove the politeness, changing the request into an order:


English
listen, please
eat, please
come, please
wait, please
drink, please

listen!
eat!
come!
wait!
drink!


romaji
ki-ite kudasai
tabe-te kudasai
ki-te kudasai
ma-tte kudasai
no-nde kudasai

ki-ite kure
tabe-te kure
ki-te kure
ma-tte kure
no-nde kure


kana
きいて ください
たべて ください
きて ください
まって ください
のんで ください

きいて くれ
たべて くれ
きて くれ
まって くれ
のんで くれ


kanji
聞いて下さい
食べて下さい
来て下さい
待って下さい
飲んで下さい

聞いてくれ
食べてくれ
来てくれ
待ってくれ
飲んでくれ


We’ll find an explanation of the -te form in the summary.

-tai form – たい

The -tai form plays the same role as the English auxiliary verb “want”; however, it only applies to what we want or do not want, not to what other people want or do not want.


non-past


positive
-tai (desu)


negative
-taku [ari-masen/nai (desu)]


We are converting the verb into an i-adjective and then conjugating it as an i-adjective, using ‘desu’ as a decorator only. For example:


I want to eat something
formal
casual

I don’t want to eat
most formal
formal
casual


nani-ka tabe-tai desu
nanka tabe-tai

 
tabe-taku ari-masen
tabe-taku nai desu
tabe-taku nai



We can mark the direct object of a -tai form with ‘ga’, because the -tai form turns the verb into an adjective, or with a ‘wo’, because the -tai form verb is still a verb; the meaning is the same whether we mark the object with ‘ga’ or ‘wo’:


i-adjectives
I want sushi.
I don’t want sake.

verbs
I eat sushi.
I don’t drink sake.

-tai form
I want to eat sushi.
I don’t want to drink sake.


 
sushi ga hoshi-i desu.
o-sake ga hoshi-ku ari-masen.

 
sushi wo tabe-masu.
o-sake wo nomi-masen.

 
sushi ga/wo tabe-tai desu.
o-sake ga/wo nomi-taku ari-masen.


We’ll find an explanation of the -tai form in the summary but, in essence, it is very simple: the -masu and -tai form change the verb in the same way; we change the verb to a pre-masu form and then, instead of following the stem with ‘masu’, we follow it with ‘tai’:


dict.
taberu
pos
neg

nomu
pos
neg


pre-masu
 
tabe-
tabe-
 
 
nomi-
nomi-


-masu
 
tabe-masu
tabe-masen
 
 
nomi-masu
nomi-masen


-tai
 
tabe-tai
tabe-taku ari-masen
 
 
nomi-tai
nomi-taku nai


Easy, right?

Prefixes and suffixes

ji – じ,時

‘ji’ (時) is the counter for hours of the clock. Unlike ‘hon’, the counter for long thin things introduced in lesson 8, ‘ji’ doesn’t change with different numbers, i.e., it is always ‘ji’. However, some numbers change:

  • ‘4:00 o’clock’ is ‘yo-ji’, not ‘yon-ji’,
  • ‘7:00 o’clock’ is ‘shichi-ji’, not ‘nana-ji’, and
  • ‘9:00 o’clock’ is ‘ku-ji’, not ‘kyu-ji’
English romaji kana kanji
1:00 o'clock ichi-ji いちじ 一時
2:00 o'clock ni-ji にじ 二時
3:00 o'clock san-ji さじ 三時
4:00 o'clock yo-ji よじ 四時
5:00 o'clock go-ji ごじ 五時
6:00 o'clock roku-ji ろくじ 六時
7:00 o'clock shichi-ji しちじ 七時
8:00 o'clock hachi-ji はちじ 八時
9:00 o'clock ku-ji くじ 九時
10:00 o'clock juu-ji じゅうじ 十時
11:00 o'clock juu-ichi-ji じゅういちじ 十一時
12:00 o'clock juu-ni-ji じゅうにじ 十二時
what time? nan-ji なんじ 何時

If we want to refer to intervals measured in hours, we add ‘kan’ (space, interval), to the counter, e.g., ‘san-ji-kan’ is ‘3 hours’, and ‘nan-ji-kan?’ is ‘how many hours?’.

Adverbs

chotto – ちょっと, 一寸

Both ‘sukoshi’ and ‘chotto’ mean ‘a little bit’, but ‘sukoshi’ is formal, while ‘chotto’ is casual. The kanji for ‘chotto’ is 一寸, but it is usually written using hiragana alone:


wait a little bit, please.
formal
casual


romaji
sukoshi matte, kudasai.
chotto matte, kudasai.


kana
すこし まって ください
ちょっと まって ください



I’ll wait a little bit
formal
casual


romaji
sukoshi machimasu
chotto machimasu


kana
すこし まちます
ちょっと まちます



I speak a little Japanese.
formal
casual


romaji
nihon-go wo sukoshi hanashi-masu
nihon-go wo chotto hanasu


Figuratively, we can use ‘chotto’ to mean ‘a little bit (difficult)’, i.e., a casual and indirect way to say ‘no’; we can also use ‘sukoshi’ but since we are being more formal, ‘sukoshi’ is usually followed by an explanation:


ima wa chotto…
ima wa sukoshi isogashi-i desu


Now? (it is) a little bit… (difficult)
Now? (I’m) a little bit busy