Japanese I-11

Kanjis: 1st grade + JLPT N5; Additional kanjis for lessons 9-16:

はん – meal ひる – noon 明日 あした – tomorrow
ばん – evening つぎ – next

Conversation transcript

This is not a transcript of the dialog in the recording.


Instructions
Listen to the following conversation


Listen again, please
mou ichido ki-ite kudasai
もう いちど きいて ください。
もういちど聞いて下さい。



English
1: Mr. Ueda; 2: Ms. Mori

1: Ms. Mori, today are you having lunch
    at the restaurant of the hotel?
2: Yes, that’s right. I’ll eat sushi;
1: Ah… I want to eat sushi too.
2: Won’t you eat with me? At 1:00 o’clock?
1: That works. Thank you.
2: Well, see you again at 1:00 o’clock.


romaji
1: ueda shi; 2: mori fujin

1: mori san, kyou hoteru no resutoran de
    hiru-go-han wo tabe-masu ka?
2: Hai, sou desu. o-suchi wo tabe-masu.
1: aa… o-sushi mo tabe-tai desu.
2: watashi to tabe-masu ka? ichi-ji ni?
1: ii desu ne. arigatou.
2: Jaa, mata ichi-ji ni.



kana
1: うえだ し; 2: もり ふじん

1: もりさん, きょう ホテルの れすとらんで
    ひるごはんを たべますか?
2: はい、そうです。おすしを たべます。
1: ああ… おすしも たべたい です。
2: わたしと たべますか? いちじに?
1: いいですね。ありがとう。
2: じゃあ、また いちじに。


kanji (show me)
1: 上田氏; 2: 森夫人

1: 森さん, 今日ホテルのレストランで
    昼ご飯を食べますか?
2: はい、そうです。おすしを食べます。
1: ああ… おすしも食べたいです。
2: 私と食べますか?1時に?
1: いいですね。ありがとう。
2: じゃあ、また1時に。


Vocabulary


English
six
seven
ten

evening
meal/rice
meal/rice (hon.)
dinner

coffee

this, the current
this evening
today (this day)

tomorrow
tomorrow evening
‘again, tomorrow

to repeat
masu (formal)
dict (casual)
-te (imperative)


romaji
roku
shichi
juu

ban
han
go-han
ban-go-han

kouhii

kon
kon-ban
kyou

ashita
ashita no ban
mata ashita

 
kurikaeshi-masu
kurikaesu
kurikaeshite


kana
ろく
しち
じゅう

ばん
はん
ごはん
ばんごはん

コーヒー

こん
こんばん
きょう

あした
あしたの ばん
また あした

 
くりかえします
くりかえす
くりかえして


kanji




ご飯
晩ご飯

 


今晩
今日

明日
明日の晩
また明日


  • 飯 (han), which has become synonymous of ‘meal’, refers specifically to cooked rice.

Sample sentences

Tonight I’m going to eat dinner at 9:00 o’clock.


formal
kon-ban ku-ji ni ban-go-han wo tabe-masu.

こんばん くじに ばんごはんを たべます。

今晩九時に晩ご飯を食べます。


casual
kon-ban ku-ji ni ban-go-han wo taberu.

こんばん くじに ばんごはんを たべる。

今晩九時に晩ご飯を食べる。



Comments

The following comments explain some of the grammar in more detail.

Prefixes and suffixes

kon – こん,今

こん means ‘this’ or ‘the current’; it refers to time only. Its kanji, 今, is pronounced ‘ima’ when it is alone, and (commonly) ‘kon’ when it’s part of a word:


English
now (this time)

this evening
‘evening?

today (this day)
‘today?

this week
this month
this year


romaji
ima

kon-ban
kon-ban-wa

kyou
kon-nichi-wa

kon-shuu
kon-getsu
ko-toshi


kana
いま

こんばん
こんばんは

きょう
こんにちは

こんじゅう
こんげつ
とし


kanji

今晩
今晩は

今日
今日は

今週
今月
今年


  • ‘today’ (今日) looses the ‘kon’ prefix, and instead of being ‘kon-nichi’ (今日) is ‘kyou’.
  • ‘kon-ban-wa’ literally is ‘How about this evening?’ but it’s treated just as the ‘good evening’ greeting

Nouns

Digits

This lesson finishes introducing the digits:


English
one
two
three
four
five
six
seven
eight
nine
ten


romaji
ichi
ni
san
shi
go
roku
shichi
hachi
ku
juu


kana
いち

さん


ろく
しち
はち

じゅう


kanji










These names have a Chinese origin but, unfortunately, the sound of some of them has an ‘unpleasant’ meaning in Japanese, so the Japanese concocted alternative names for such numbers:


English
four
seven
nine


romaji
shi
shi-chi
ku


Japanese meaning
death
death-blood
pain, suffering


alternate name
yon
nana
kyuu


In general, it’s a matter of personal preference whether we say 4 as ‘shi’ or ‘yon’; same thing with 7, and 9. In some cases, it isn’t, though, and we have to use either one of the other. For example, “4:00 o’clock” is always ‘yo-ji’, never ‘shi-ji’; and ‘7:00 o’clock’ is always ‘shichi-ji’, never ‘nana-ji’.

The names of some of the four biggest Japanese islands are based on the number of provinces they used to have:


English
Honshu
Hokkaido
Kyushu
Shikoku


romaji
hon-shuu
hok-kai-dou
kyuu-shuu
shi-koku


kanji
本州

九州
四国


meaning
Main province

Nine provinces
Four countries


where ‘shuu’ (州) means ‘province’. Kyushu is also called ‘kyuu-koku’ (九国, ‘Nine Countries’).

The largest four islands of Japan: Honshu, Hokkaido, Kyushu, and Shikoku.

Ashita – 明日

Ashita means ‘tomorrow’. Let’s compare its kanjis together with those for ‘today’, i.e., 今日.


English
now, the current
bright, the coming
Sun, day


kanji



kun-yomi
ima
a-karu
hi


on-yomi
kon
myou
nichi


Hence, we would expect ‘today’ to be ‘kon-nichi’, instead of ‘kyou’; still, ‘kon-nichi’ is the base of ‘kon-nichi-wa’, which means ‘(how about) this day?’, or ‘hello’. Likewise, we would expect ‘tomorrow’ to be ‘myou-nichi’ and, indeed, ‘myou-nichi’ is a very formal way to say ‘tomorrow’. And yet another way to say ‘tomorrow’, common in weather forecasting, is ‘asu’. All ‘ashita’, ‘asu’, and ‘myou-nichi’ mean ‘tomorrow’ and are written with the same kanjis, i.e., 明日:


politeness level
very formal
formal
casual


romaji
myou-nichi
asu
ashita


kana
みょうにち
あす
あした


kanji
明日
明日
明日